HEALTH: facts about high blood pressure.

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HEALTH:   facts about high blood pressure.

💢    High blood pressure ” killed 46,765 Americans” in 2001. It was listed as a primary or contributing cause of death in about 251,000 U.S. deaths in 2000.

💢   According to research, in 2010, there were more than “20 million cases of hypertension in Nigeria” affecting one in-three men and one-in-four women. This is set to rise to 39 million cases by 2030.

💢  Studies show that over “100 million Nigerians are hypertensive” and the number keeps increasing because of factors like lifestyles and urbanity. According to the Chief Medical Director, CMD, of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, LASUTH, Professor Adewale Oke.

   In Nigeria for example, HBP/Hypertension is the number one “risk” factor for stroke, heart failure, ischemic heart disease, and kidney failure.

💢  One in five Nigerians (and one in four adults) has high blood pressure.

   💢  Of all people with high blood pressure, 11% aren’t on therapy (special diet or drugs), 25% are on inadequate therapy, and 34% are on adequate therapy.

💢  The cause of 90–95% of the cases of high blood pressure isn’t known; however, high blood pressure is easily detected and usually controllable.

💢     High blood pressure affects more than 40% of African Americans.

💢  Finally, 30% of Those With High Blood Pressure Don’t Even Know They Have It!!

💢  You can have high blood pressure for years without any symptoms. Uncontrolled high blood pressure increases your risk of serious health problems, including heart attack and stroke.

     Fortunately, high blood pressure can be easily detected. And once you know you have high blood pressure, you can work with your doctor to control it.

       Signs  of High blood pressure

      Most people with high blood pressure have no signs ,  even if blood pressure readings reach dangerously high levels.

        A few people with high blood pressure may have headaches, shortness of breath or nosebleeds, but these signs and symptoms aren’t specific and usually don’t occur until high blood pressure has reached a severe or life-threatening stage.

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